greygirlbeast: (Default)
And I begin this...here.

No. Here.

Happy birthday, David Lynch! And Federico Fellini!

The snow finally came last night, and more will come tomorrow. We're about to go forth and do what errands must be done. But first, I'll write this journal entry. Because I wish to remember yesterday, for one thing.

We left Providence a little after one thirty (CaST) and made it to New Haven (CT) by three-thirty (also CaST). There were snow flurries along the highway, from a sky that was as sunny as it was cloudy. But they were the sorts of cloud that drop snow. I read from Lightspeed: Year One while Spooky drove and kept me informed about the flurries and birds and dead racoons. We parked off Whitney, on Sachem Street (saw a bumper sticker at the labs: "Honk If You Understand Punctuated Equilibrium"), and I got about two hours with the dinosaurs at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Mostly, I sat on the wooden benches and stared up at the creatures Marsh named, the legacy of Richard Swan Lull, and George Ostrom, and Rudolph Zallinger's famous The Age of Reptiles mural (1943-1947) bringing it all to life (no matter how inaccurate we may now know it to be; many of our own imaginings will be disproven in due course – and I am not surprised LJ doesn't know how to spell the past participle of disprove; of course, I maybe misusing the past participle, but that doesn't absolve LJ of its ignorance).

And sure, these are the old circa 1930s-40s "tail-dragging" dinosaur mounts. But those are the images of dinosaurs that I grew up with. Back before the Renaissance of the 1970s, before it was understood that most dinosaurs were active, endothermic creatures, not sluggish reptiles. Before it acknowledged that, not only did birds evolve directly from dinosaurs, but that "birds" are surviving theropod dinosaurs, and many Mesozoic theropods had feathers. And so forth. I am comforted by these old visions of blundering, ectothermic monsters.

At some point, I opened my iPad just to see if I could actually get reception in there. It felt a like horrible sacrilege, but I signed into the Yale server as a guest and posted to Facebook: "Writing from inside the dinosaur gallery at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. This is MY church." A testament to the cosmic circle. No beginning. No end. Life, being a transient state of matter, and so here is my church.

Spooky was off looking at taxidermied crows and archaeological doodads, but when she returned, we went upstairs together to see live snakes in the children's "Discovery Room." One thing that makes the Yale Peabody so precious to me is that, while acknowledging science education for children, it hasn't turned itself into a theme park, as have so many American museums. Those that have allowed budgetary panic to morph them into nightmares of "edutainment" (Oh, fuck. LJ doesn't know disproven, but it knows the vile portmanteau edutainment. Fuck.). The Peabody is still a place where I can sit in peace with the past. Where there is still a stately air of respect for science and its endeavors. Truth is, the Great Hall at the Peabody calms me more than any of my meds, or any story I will ever write, or any painting I will ever paint.

Here are some photos:

19 January 2012 )


We left about 5:30 CaST, and made it back to Providence around 8 p.m. The snow came in earnest about nine or ten. The sky was creamsicle. I love creamsicle night skies.

Since my last LJ entry, I have – in stray moments – been reading short fiction, all from the aforementioned Lightspeed: Year One. Tananarive Due's "Patient Zero" (2008), Kristine Kathryn Rusch's "The Observer" (2008), David Tallerman's Jenny's Sick (2010), Anne McCaffrey's "Velvet Fields" (1973), and Eric Gregory's "The Harrowers" (2011). I liked Gregory and Tallerman the best; most of the stories would have benefited by being a bit longer, especially "Velvet Fields," which felt like a synopsis. The McCaffrey piece is little more than an outline, really. The Gregory piece felt short, but mostly that's just because it left me wanting more, which is a good trick for an author to turn and suggests no obligation to actually provide more.

Also, here's a rather good entry by [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna on the fluidity of names, on those of us who cast off our birth names before we become artists. And sexism.

I do mean to write about my feelings on internet piracy and SOPA/PIPA, but there's no time now. Spooky and I have to run errands before ice and more snow arrives, and I have email.

Like dinosaurs, the snow is helping.

Somewhat calmer,
Aunt Beast
greygirlbeast: (Jayne Dork)
In SW:toR we're on a strictly RP (not even RP/PVE) server, and most names are appropriate, and people RP. But, here and there, you spot the morons. Because they want to be spotted. They fashion themselves rebels and wits. Anyway, from last night, the "name," spotted by Spooky, Z'omglol.

The idiot was gone before I could even tell him what a fucking idiot he was.
greygirlbeast: (Bjorkdroid)
Yesterday, I wrote another 2,292 words of Chapter 5 of The Drowning Girl: A Memoir. I begin to suspect this is the bottomless chapter. This book, its become a fever, and the pages are a fevered blur. Part of me says, slow down, slow down, I'm going to break it, but this other part of me is insisting, no, no, the speed of the telling is integral, its a confession and there's no way she'd write it slowly, so neither can I. Maybe I'll try to explain, someday, how I'm a "method writer."

Today I have to try to write the "hardest scene," or only the second hardest. Hard on Imp, and hard on me.

The nightmares are worse than they've been in a long time. A tumult of calamity and past events that never actually occurred.

The new issue of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology came yesterday, December 2010. It was late, in part because it was shipped with a huge memoir describing a pugnacious little terrestrial croc named Simosuchus. There's also the description of a new genus and species of bothremydid turtle, Chupacabrachelys complexus. The name's etymology deserves a moment of explanation. To quote the paper's authors, "The chupacabra (Spanish for 'goat sucker') is a mythical creature in contemporary Mexican-American legend said to feed on livestock in the border region of Texas and Mexico. The skull of Chupacabrachelys resembles that of a mangy coyote believed to be responsible for chupacabra sightings in South Texas during 2008." Also, for the species, "In recognition of 'the Complex Tour' performance of the Blue Man Group, which provided the authors with many hours of entertainment during collection and preparation of the type and referred specimens."

I left the house late yesterday and went to the market and an art supply store with Spooky. I was amazed at how much the snow hasn't melted. Everything is still blanketed. There are banks of snow five and six feet high where snowplows and shovels have heaped it. The Providence River below the Point Street Bridge is frozen over.

Good roleplay in Insilico last night (thank you, Tracy). It's been just a little more than a year since I discovered Insilico. And while it didn't live up to the embarrassingly optimistic hype I ladled over it, I've found that the sim does, nonetheless, provide a fine backdrop for private cyberpunk rp. Spooky and I played WoW, and I'm still liking the Twilight Highlands. Last night, for the first time since I started playing in October 2008, I found myself holding more than 20,000 gold. No, I haven't ever done raids, and most of the money I make in WoW comes from auctions and quests.

And now, there will be doughnuts.

My Name(s)

Jun. 26th, 2006 12:16 am
greygirlbeast: (chi6)
This seemed a vaguely interesting sort of thing, so I snurched it from [livejournal.com profile] mevennen (who likely gave far more entertaining answer than I'm about to give):

1. What does your first name mean?

Caitlín (Irish; kayt-LEEN, though most people pronounce it kayt-LIN), but I must admit I'm not certain of it's etymology. Different books say different things. Some suggest it's a Gaelicised version of the Greek name Catherine, brought to Eire by the Normans; others seem to imply Caitlín and Catharine merely sound alike. Whatever. There are an insane number of variants, including, but I'm sure not limited to: Cait, Caitilin, Caitlan, Caitland, Caitlann, Caitlinn, Caitlyn, Caitlynn, Caitrin, Catelan, Cateline, Catelinn, Catelyn, Catelynn, Catlin, Catline, Catlyn, Catriona, Cayelin, Caylin, Kaitlan, Kaitlann, Kaitlin, Kaitlinn, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelan, Katelin, Katelyn, Katelynn, Kayelin and Kayelyn. Meaning? "Pure." It is to laugh, yes?

2. What does your middle name mean?

Rebekah. Hebrew. "Bound. Captivating. A knotted cord." At least that's somewhat accurate.

3. What does your last name mean?

Kiernan. From the Irish, "Mac Thighearnain." Lots of variants, including MacKiernan, Tiernan, Tierny, McKernan, McKernon, McKernin, McKernen & etc. "First found in county Cavan where they held a family seat from ancient times." And " Carnan, a heap; figuratively, a strong man, a thick-set, stout man. Cearnan, local, a square, a quadrangle."

4. So what does your name mean when put together?

Hence, I am a "pure and captivating quadrangle."

5. What would you have been named if you were the opposite gender?

Let's not go there.

6. Any other name oddities?

I once used the stage name "Aleisha Palance" for a whole year. My Nebari name is Nar'eth ni'glecti Mericale. Or, rather, Caitlín R. Kiernan is the human alias for Nar'eth ni'glecti Mericale. I've sometimes considered changing my name to Merricat (thank you, Shirley Jackson). I've also considered changing it to Sebastian (thank you, Tennessee Williams).

7. Do you like your name?

Not as much as I used to like it.

8. What do you like best about it?

That it's Irish. That my signature is illegible, save the C and K.

9. What do you like least about it?

That no one ever spells it correctly, and there have been grand and hilarious mispronunciations. That my middle initial is often ignored.

10. If you had to change your name (witness protection program, whatever), what would you want it to be?

Well, I've already listed Merricat and Sebastian. I've also considered coming clean and legally changing it to Nar'eth ni'glecti Mericale. At least then people would have an excuse for mispronouncing it.

Profile

greygirlbeast: (Default)
Caitlín R. Kiernan

February 2012

S M T W T F S
    1 234
56 7 891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26272829   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 27th, 2017 01:42 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios