greygirlbeast: (sol)
[personal profile] greygirlbeast
I listen to R.E.M. a lot, and it will always be the music of Athens, GA, though I actually first discovered their music in Boulder, CO many, many years before I moved to Athens.

Spooky says I'm homesick. I'm not sure she's correct. But maybe it's something akin to homesickness.

---

I find myself needing to be tactful, though, no matter how hard I may try, I am never the most tactful of beasts. I get a lot of requests from aspiring writers, requests for me to read their work and/or offer advice on how they can become better writers, find an agent, find a publisher, and so forth. I can't answer all of these requests personally. Not one at a time, I mean. So, I'm answering the most recent batch personally here. And it's a short answer. Or a short set of answers. Truthfully, I can't help you. It's been nineteen years since I began my first novel, and eighteen since I sold my first short story, and sixteen since my first fiction publication, fifteen since I finished Silk, and fourteen years since I sold my first novel. It's been sixteen years since I got my my first agent. Now, the point of all those 'teens is that during the intervening years, publishing has changed, and it's changed in ways I only just begin to understand. For example, I used to type query letters, mail them (in an envelope with a stamp and an SASE enclosed, from an actual post office), and wait weeks for a reply. Back then, books were either paper or recorded on cassette (a few books-on-CD recordings were popping up). I could give a lot more "for examples." But, what's even more important than the changes that have been wrought upon the publishing industry is the simple fact that I'm not a writing instructor, and only a critic in the roughest sense. Sure, you could show me a story, and I could tell you whether or not I liked it. But, for the most part, that's useless to you. My opinion on any given piece of fiction is mostly subjective (aside from correcting grammar and so forth). I might love it. I might think it's a load of shit. A lot of what I think is shit sells like hotcakes, and a lot of what I think is brilliant can't sell for shit. And that should tell you everything you need to know, right there. Finally, I simply don't have time to read your work, not if I'm going to get my own writing done and have some semblance of a life in between. So...I hope you'll accept these answers, and understand them.

---

I'm trying very hard to get myself back into the head-space that will allow me to finish Blood Oranges. But it's not going well. I tried to read Chapter Four aloud on Friday night, and I only made it a few pages in. The reasons are complex. My instinct is to shelve the manuscript and move on to the next project. But that would be ridiculous, if only because the novel is half finished. And it was coming so quickly before this wall.

We fall, or are knocked down, and we get up again. Or we stop calling ourselves writers.

---

Yesterday, Spooky and Sonya and I escaped the broiling confines of the house, and endured truly horrendous touron traffic to cross the Western Passage of Narragansett Bay to Conanicut Island. Beavertail was dazzling. The sea off the west side of the point was such a dazzling blue gem it might have blinded me. Not my eyes, but other portions of my self in need of blinding. There's been far too much stress, lately. Stress I am ill equipped to cope with. There were more people at Beavertail than I'm used to seeing, but it was still easy to find a relatively secluded bit of phyllite jutting out into the bay on which to spread our blanket. About a hundred yards to the north, a flock of cormorants perched on the rocks. Occasionally one would streak away, skimming just over the surface of the sea. Or one would dive in and fish. There were gulls and robins and red-winged black birds. We fed a gull a cheese cracker. Just north of us was a rowdy lot of college kids, swimming and drinking beer and using watermelon rinds as hats. Spooky and I lay on the blanket. Sonya waded in. We weren't able to stay even nearly long enough, especially considering the the traffic there and back, and how hot sitting in the traffic was (the loaner car has no AC), but Sonya had a 6:27 p.m. train back to Boston. Amazingly, neither Kathryn nor I are sunburned (we did use sunscreen, but still).

Back home, Spooky and I had tuna for dinner. We watched more of Law and Order: Criminal Intent, and our Faeblight Rift toons reached level 18. It was a quiet evening, and we mostly managed not to sweat.

I think I'm going to spend the next couple of days sweating and writing something for Sirenia Digst #68.

There are photos from yesterday, but Earthlink is all whack-a-doodle, so I'll have to try to post them tomorrow.

No Sea, So Less Calm Than Yesterday,
Aunt Beast

Date: 2011-07-10 06:26 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] literateshrew.livejournal.com
Can I just say, as a baby author (getting my first novel published from a small press early 2012! yay!)... I have been reading your journal and your work for a few years now, and you have taught me more just by talking about your process and your life than you possibly could have if I had emailed you some impertinent and naive question. So keep on keeping on.

And if any of those question-asking writers are reading this... just do it. Just write. Stop worrying about whether it's good or it's marketable or whatever. Just. Keep. Trucking. And leave published authors alone. Unless it's to send them presents, buy their stuff on Amazon or greet them nicely at cons.

Date: 2011-07-10 06:33 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] greygirlbeast.livejournal.com

I have been reading your journal and your work for a few years now, and you have taught me more just by talking about your process and your life than you possibly could have if I had emailed you

I never thought of the blog that way. Or if I did, it was a long time ago, and I forgot. But it's true, I think. Read the blogs of published authors. At the very least, you will learn of the hell that is (for most of us) our lives.

Date: 2011-07-10 07:00 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] literateshrew.livejournal.com
It really does make me feel less alone to read about your work day. It's good to know I'm not alone slaving in the word mines and worrying about how the bills will get paid.

Date: 2011-07-10 07:50 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] kaz-mahoney.livejournal.com
I am sorry about the Blood Oranges wall. I wanted you to know that I just read the first chapter in SD and absolutely loved it. For real, 100% loved everything about it. It's like nothing of yours I've ever read before, but still has the CRK flourish and heart-slicing voice I fully expect.

It's also fucking hilarious.

Date: 2011-07-10 07:58 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] greygirlbeast.livejournal.com

I wanted you to know that I just read the first chapter in SD and absolutely loved it. For real, 100% loved everything about it. It's like nothing of yours I've ever read before, but still has the CRK flourish and heart-slicing voice I fully expect.

It's also fucking hilarious.


Thank you. Compliments won't solve the problem, but they don't hurt, either.

Date: 2011-07-11 05:07 am (UTC)
ext_18153: (Default)
From: [identity profile] kirby-crow.livejournal.com
You know it's too hot when watermelon hats don't sound like a bad idea.

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Caitlín R. Kiernan

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